Jerusalem light train

Removing Veolia Environnement, Transdev and Caisse des Dépôts et Consignations (CDC) from the Who Profits Database

Until August 2015, Trasndev, a subsidiary of Veolia Environnement, held a minority interest (5%) in CityPass, a consortium that won the tender by the Israeli government to build the JLR, as well as full ownership (100%) of the train’s operator – Connex Jerusalem. The JLR, which began operating in December 2011, was designed to connect the western part of Jerusalem to the illegal settlements surrounding the city. Its route crosses the Green Line and passes through the Palestinian neighborhoods of Shuafat and Beit Hanina.

Veolia sells its shares in the Jerusalem Light Rail and completes withdrawal from the Israeli market

Israeli authorities’ approval and ownership transfer

Until August 2015, Trasndev, a Veolia Environnement subsidiary, held a minority interest (5%) in CityPass, a consortium tendered by the Israeli government to build the JLR, as well as full ownership (100%) of the train’s operator - Connex Jerusalem. The JLR was designed to connect the western part of Jerusalem with the illegal settlements surrounding the city. Operational since December 2011, the JLR crosses the Green Line and passes through the Palestinian neighborhoods of Shuafat and Beit Hanina.

Eye in the Sky: New Aerial Surveillance Systems and the Jerusalem Light Rail

Background

The Jerusalem Light Rail is the first of several lines included in Jerusalem’s planned mass-transit system. The rail (also known as the Red Line) became fully operational in December 2011. Since then, its trams carry some 130,000 passengers a day, along a 13.8 kilometer route from West Jerusalem to the settlement of Pisgat Zeev in occupied East Jerusalem, crossing the Green Line and the Palestinian neighborhoods of Shuafat and Beit Hanina.

Financing the Israeli Occupation: The Current Involvement of Israeli Banks in Israeli Settlement Activity

In October 2010, Who Profits published a report about the Israeli banks' involvement in the Israeli occupation. The Israeli banks provide the financial infrastructure for activities of companies, governmental agencies and individuals in the occupied Palestinian territories and the Syrian Golan Heights.

Business on forbidden land: Danish business relations with the Israeli occupation

A New report by Dan Watch revels the Danish business relations with the Israeli occupation of Palestinian land and resources.

The report describes the reality of occupation and the separation wall, the violations of the freedom of movement, the oppressive Palestinian labour in settlements and the aggravation of Settler violence.