Tzarfati Garage | Mishor Adumim industrial zone, West Bank | June 2015 | Photographed by Who ProfitsTzarfati Garage | Mishor Adumim industrial zone, West Bank | December 2007 | Photographed by Who ProfitsLand Rover logo at the entrance to Tzarfati Garage | Mishor Adumim industrial zone, West Bank | June 2015 | Photographed by Who Profits
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An Israeli garage network servicing private, commercial and military vehicles. The company headquarters are located in Mishor Adumim settlement industrial zone in the West Bank, where it also operates a welding workshop and a licensed garage for the brands of; DAF, Scania, IVECO, Land Rover, International, Chevrolet and Isuzu. The Mishor Adumim garage supplies car repair services to civilians but its largest client is the Israeli army. 

During the 2014 attack on Gaza (Operation Protective Edge), and in order to prevent its Palestinian workers from striking, the company claimed in the Israeli Labor Court to be an "essential factory" of the Israeli army. In this case, the claimed legal status has functioned as a tool to halt the workers' strike.

The company employs Palestinian workers in exploitative conditions. According to WAC-MAAN - the workers' union, the garage did not meet legal employment standards. The workers' daily wage was less than the minimum wage. No deductions were made for their National Insurance or pension funds, and workers did not received their social rights such as vacation pay, sick pay or convalescence pay.

In June 2013, the workers have affiliated themselves with WAC-MAAN in order to improve their employment conditions and immediately started negotiating for fair wages and the benefits prescribed by Israeli labor law. However, In July 2014 the garage made false complaints against Hatem Abu Ziadeh - the Head of the Workers Committee, at the Ma'ale Adumim Police Station, accusing him of deliberately damaging the brakes of an army vehicle under repair at the garage. The Civil Administration then revoked his working permit. The complaint was made to the police some 18 days after the alleged “sabotage,” and after the employer had already invited Abu Ziadeh to a pre-dismissal hearing on grounds that had no connection to security. Subsequently, the Palestinian workers opened a strike at the end of July, and WAC-MAAN turned to the Labor Court. Only then did the employer produce the security accusation, thus succeeding in preventing the Committee Head from reaching his work place. Following a petition to the High Court of Justice, the Israeli Security Services declined Abu Ziadeh's temporary restraining order in December that year.